Published:  April 12, 2016

This issue of the HDIAC Journal looks at how Special Operations Forces use the latest technological innovations to increase warfighter effectiveness. Then the Journal explores research to mitigate and decontaminate urban, wide-area radiological contamination. Next, researchers discuss poor performance in unfamiliar face recognition. In addition, scientists look at social media’s impact on operations in megacities. Finally, the Journal features a hemostatic foam with potential to increase successful treatment and transport of soldiers injured on the battlefield. This issue also highlights three of HDIAC’s technical inquiries. HDIAC received questions relating to water purification methods to support deployed troops; safety culture assessments and incident rates in the U.S. pipeline industry; and Department of Defense applications for CS-GAG hydrogels.

In This Issue

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unfamiliar facial recognition

Unfamiliar Face Recognition

Familiar Face Recognition A person’s ability to recognize familiar faces across a wide range of viewing conditions is one of the most impressive facets of human cognition. As shown in Figure 1, it is easy…

Safety Culture in the U.S. Pipeline Industry

Safety Culture in the U.S. Pipeline Industry

The Homeland Defense and Security Information Analysis Center received a request for research and analysis of safety culture assessments and incident rates within the U.S. pipeline industry. HDIAC highlighted the most commonly occurring safety incidents…

Megacities Through the Lens of Social Media By: Anthony

Megacities Through the Lens of Social Media

Urbanization and Megacities Over the past half century, the worldwide urban population grew from 746 million in 1950 to 3.9 billion in 2014, and experts project the population will reach 5 billion in 2030 and…

Hydrogels in Biomedical Applications

Hydrogels in Biomedical Applications

The Homeland Defense and Security Information Analysis Center recently conducted research and analysis on possible Department of Defense applications for chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan hydrogels. Background CS-GAG hydrogels are a modification of hyaluronic acid. HA, found…

Sprayable Foam: Limiting Blood Loss on the Battlefield

Sprayable Foam: Limiting Blood Loss on the Battlefield

Combat survivability is at an all-time high, however caring for the wounded on the battlefield is an ongoing challenge for military forces. The ability to quickly stabilize the injured on-site increases the likelihood of successful…

Military Water Filtration

Military Water Filtration

The Homeland Defense and Security Information Analysis Center received a request for research and analysis of alternative methods for water purification to support deployed troops. HDIAC provided a comparative data analysis, as well as cost-benefit…

Leveraging Innovation to Improve Battlefield Performance

Leveraging Innovation to Improve Battlefield Performance

Introduction Special Operations Forces work in demanding, high-risk environments. The soldiers train to succeed in the most complex missions; they are prepared to provide expert support for national objectives; and must be capable of handling…

EPA & DHS Partner in Radiation Decontamination Project

EPA & DHS Partner in Radiation Decontamination Project

If a dirty bomb detonates or a nuclear power plant accident occurs, responders must be equipped to handle the resulting potential wide-area radiological contamination. Minimizing radiological contamination, protecting people and the environment, and restoring services…